Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Fixed geared bikes vs. Geared Bikes: Really?

Single Speeds vs. Geared bikes- Is this even a fair contest?

When Shopping around for a new bicycle, there really are comparisons which should never come to mind, like "should I go with a geared bike, or a single speed?". It is one thing to opt for the single speed due to the price point or because it suits the terrain and riding style you will be riding on. It is another thing entirely to make claims that a single speed will give you the same advantages of a geared bicycle. If a single speed or fixed gear bike is aesthetically pleasing and it's all some people can afford, that's fine, I won't judge. The important thing is that the person buys a bike and becomes an active person no matter how they decide to do it. But a single-speedster (as cool as they might think they look toting around a carrier bag and wearing Ray Ban wayfarers) will get killed, every single time, when going up a steep hill on their 52/12  gear ratio bicycle. The other alternative to using a ratio like this is getting a larger cog in the rear wheel and going with a smaller gearing ratio in the front. While that will make climbing easier, the rider will lose the ability to effectively sprint and will have an overall too high a cadence to hold up for long rides.

Some may argue that the first bicycles ever raced were single speeds. In fact, some of the early ( and I mean 1920's) racers thought of geared bikes as being suited for younger, inexperienced riders. Some people will tell you that they cross train on single speed bicycles in the winter, in order to mash the pedals harder come summertime. Some people claim these bikes are low maintenance because you do not have to fiddle around with the derailleurs and the chain is thicker on the bike. These reasons, while good, do not serve the purposes of average day to day riders.  Some people can unknowingly buy a single speed bike as their first bicycle. They might like their introduction into cycling, or they might absolutely hate it, leaving their bikes on the side of the hill in frustration.

From a pricing standard, there are similarly priced geared and non-geared bicycles on the market. It is really almost purely up to personal preference. Geared bicycles have opened up worlds to cyclists to ride places many didn't even think were possible, such as riding a bike up a mountain in the Rockies or randonneuring the Alps. These things would be impossible to do on a fixed gear bike (unless you have a Nexus hub).

Adding to the DE-evolution of the bicycle, the hipster posing crowd has taken the fixed gear bike a step further, removing the drop bars and replacing them with 4 inch wide straight handlebars. The bike ends up looking like a larger, goofier  cousin of the BMX instead of a road bike.

I have been a silent on-looker of this phenomenon, not wanting to get involved on the intricacies and foolishness of this subject. But for the record, a single speed bike cannot go uphill for very long (and I mean hours). It cannot win in a grand tour. It can time trial at a velodrome if it's a track bike, but a trip to the grocery store will cause all sorts of hurt. Single speed mountain bikes are not faster than geared bikes. A single speed series for racing should exist for bragging rights only, because the single speed crowd need their own category to be competitive. They should stick to the alley cat races they do in the inner cities.  These bikes are built for fun and some utility for those who live in flat areas. The geared bicycle is a step up, not a step down, on the evolutionary scale of the bicycle. It's the all rounder, better deal of the two options.

Even real bike messengers will realize that Quick Silver was just a movie. Many messengers use single speed bikes but a lot use geared bikes too. Kevin Bacon and Laurence Fishurne created a cult following of Walz-capped skinny jean wearing The Onion subscribers which like to pose as the characters of the movie. To Fishburne's credit, he rode the real bike ( an 85' Raleigh Gran Prix) in the movie. The rest of the bikes featured were wannabe bikes for the truly great cycling era in which this movie was made. The Hinaults, Merckxs, Le Monds, and Fignon's of the day are the figures that kids should look up to nowadays. The tough as nails riders, the hard-men, winning back to back victories on their STEEL and GEARED bicycles.

Just a thought, or a rant. You decide.

May 25, 2013- There is some new evidence to show that single speed mountain bikes can place well in 50 mile amateur endurance events. Check out the results of the 2012 Wiskey 50, where the overall winner won by a margin of two minutes riding on a single speed bike. There are more examples of single speed riders outperforming geared riders in competition, but they seem to be the exception rather than the norm. I encourage all gifted single speed riders to continue to challenge and eventually overturn the status quo. In the end, it's not be bike, but the engine that does the work.

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Article review as of October 1, 2013: In response to this article, I have written another article that goes into a little more depth regarding some of the statements I made in this single speed vs. geared bicycle debate. To read more about it, click here. To be clear, the title of this article is wrong. It should read fixed gear bikes vs. geared bikes, really? I apologize for that, and as of today the title has been changed. This article is calling out the fallacies of riding a fixed gear bicycle, something all cyclists, including those who ride single speed bikes, will understand and stand behind. 

If a bike frame has horizontal track dropouts, then it should be ridden as a single speed. If a cyclist finds a good bicycle frame with a derailleur hanger but only has a single speed wheelset, chainring and chain, then that cyclist should ride the bike single speed without hacking off the derailleur hanger. Common sense, right? What I completely disagree with is someone going completely out of their way and to great lengths to make their bike a single speed. That would be like myself, for instance, taking the 52t chainring out of my Campagnolo C-Record crank, removing my Sachs 8 speed freewheel for a generic single speed cog, taking off my Regina America 92' rear derailleur and hacking out the dropout, and then binding the whole mess together with a chromed out cruiser chain. Does anyone else find that offensive? Ridiculous? I put together a montage of these ridiculous bikes here. I'm sure any of my disgruntled readers who misunderstood the message of this article would never own bikes like these, because like me, they love their bikes and they love cycling.

I really appreciate all the feedback I am getting from all my international readers. They understand that we all need to stand together as cyclists in solidarity rather than letting our differences split us apart. Unfortunately that message doesn't translate well here in the states, where any difference or preference categorizes people and puts them against others who are not like them. As far as cyclists go, here in the states we have roadies, retro-grouches, hipsters, triathletes, commuters, bmx'ers, etc.; all with their own sets of etiquette and societal rules. The one thing we should all share is our love for cycling and our desire to see more protection for cyclists out on the roads. In order to see a world that embraces cyclists, we as cyclists need to follow the rules. Fixed gear culture is about risk taking, running lights and endangerment. The risk is compounded with fixed gear riders deliberately strip the brakes off of their bikes, and only stop using their rear wheel. That is why I am focusing on this group. That is why I call people who alter their bikes to fixed gear hipsters. I have co-workers who ride fixed gear bicycles. They make all their stop signs and traffic lights. They act responsibly on the roads. This is not the message certain movies have been popularizing. If cyclists are continued to be portrayed as risk taking daredevils, efforts to make cycling accessible as a means of transportation will be ignored by society.

To all my readers, ride safely. Use brakes, don't run signs, and keep subscribing to more posts from a Bicycle's Point of View.

30 comments:

  1. ...and all bicycles represent a de-evolution of the motorcycle. What was your point again?

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    1. The first Harley Davison was a bicycle with a motor in it so not a very bright observation Nimzo.

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  2. If you're like me and riding for the fitness aspect, single speed is the only way to fly. I've just started commuting home from my work (25km one-way) and I do it through a very hilly ride on a single speed dirt jumper.

    It's one HELL of a workout not being able to drop gears, and I absolutely refuse to ever get off and walk a bike. I'm running a 38/16 setup with a 24" drive wheel and I'm pretty much spent by the top of the steepest hills. I've got a 14T cog sitting at home waiting to be swapped in when I build the strength. If I run that out I can swap to a 26" drive wheel.

    Not to mention, I'm hard on bikes and I've never managed to break a single speed. Geared is not always better my friend.

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  3. It sounds like you get a great workout out of your single speed. The important thing is that you are getting your exercise and even using your bicycle to get to work.

    On VERY steep hills, like the ones you see in Colorado, I will drop from my 52 tooth chainring down to my 44 on the front. However, if I'm just riding flat or undulating terrain my gear ratio is usually 52/16 cruising or 52/12 when I'm hammering down. Most of my climbing is done on a 52/18 and maybe a 52/21 ratio, I usually ride my 12 speed vintage bike. Either way, it is very useful to be able to switch gears on the fly without having to remove the rear wheel to do so (I use old school shift levers when I'm shifting gears). Your setup is great for constant hill climbing but offers little versatility otherwise, on different types of terrain which might suit speed.

    I have still to find anyone that can climb a hill faster than I can on a single speed or fixed gear (on any bike for that matter, it's not bragging if it's true). I have been passed before by single speed bicycles that used a high gear ratio like 52/12, but in both cases the guys were on their aero TT bars. I have strong legs but I can't say that that came as a result of using a single speed. In fact, when it comes to climbing, climbing faster is the result of a higher cadence that requires the rider to be in the right gear ratio to do so, and sometimes there is no "one gear ratio fits all" solution for this.

    I love the feedback I am getting on this topic. Many fixed geared riders offering their perspective. I just want to say I respect and appreciate all your opinions. Maybe on day I might be persuaded to fix one of my bikes, but I also hope I can persuade readers the other way around.





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  4. Really very nice and topical discussion, Got lot of information.
    Thank you
    Curtis J.

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  5. The main reasons the Single Speed bike is doing an up is bike messengers.

    Bike messenger culture shows loads of simmilarities with the hipster community and thus they've adopted it.

    The reason bike messengers ride singlespeed is because it's dirt cheap. Then also, since city roads can be quite haggard, they don't have a clapping rear deraileur.

    They don't race the cities on double butted alloy frames with high end forks and what not. They simply can't afford it.

    I have a 30 speed bike, which I think are too much gears, hell I never shift to the smallest front cog. Mostly because I live in the Netherlands and it's flat as hell. But because of the 52/16 ratio or even smaller I can manage speeds of 36/38 km/h.

    However I'm planning on doing a trip to italy next year. 52/16 would kill me on the mountains.

    Thats what I've experienced so far.

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    1. Hi Ori,

      Thanks for sharing your experience. I always look forward to someone's point of view especially if they are living outside the States. Here in the states bicycle manufacturers like to overload consumers with a broad selection or similarly priced bicycles. So a single speed or fixed gear bicycle costs about as much as a bicycle with gears. New York City, Portland, Seattle and Chicago are some of the only cities that actually use bicycle messengers in the whole country. So the application for a messenger style bicycle does not apply to the majority of U.S consumers. I am also not a fan of too many gears,however I do believe that there are gear ratios for sprinting and gear ratios for climbing. The more time passes the more I realize that a good cyclist will be good on any kind of bicycle, whether it has multiple gears or not. I appreciate your balanced view though.

      Have fun in Italy, please get back with me on your travels. That is one place I would really love to visit.

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  6. Well I bought a geared one thinking that it would be faster and easier but it is a pain in the ass.I mean it is way better than the single speed one when it comes to off roading but on plains,I prefer the other one.

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    1. Do you ride a single speed mountain bike or a road bike? There is a lot of support of the use of single speed mountain bikes as I have already mentioned in the article. I also mentioned that single speed bikes are best suited for flat surfaces, and that the rider should take into account the lay of the land before deciding which bicycle will suit them best.

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  7. I don't think single speed mountain bikes are best suited to flat terrain. I think they're best suited to consistent terrain. In mountainous/hilly areas I gear for the climbs and stay off the brakes on the descents. I won't argue that single speeds are faster, but I'd like to say that I've gotten first place overall in Cat 2 on a rigid single speed. Usually single speed vs geared times are comparable in XC races, and yes there are hills in Mississippi, however small. Personally I'm faster uphill on a single speed whether it's 100 yards or 5 miles, but I don't have the self discipline to stay in a high gear given an option. For serious road riding, I do prefer gears, flats or hills. Give single speed mtn biking a try before you knock it.

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    1. Hi Brandon,

      Someday when the gears stop working on my rigid 26er I will give SS mtn biking a try. Nobody is knocking SS mtn bikes, myself included. I even mentioned examples at the end of this article on how specifically single speed mountain biking has had proven results in the XC racing scene. This article isn't targeting mountain bikers. And although I may have made a generalization or two about single speed (mainly fixed gear) bicycles, I was fair and factual in describing the capabilities, limitations and intended uses of these types of bicycles, especially on the pavement. What the bicycle is intended to do and what the rider is capable of doing are two different things, and a good cyclist will be good on any kind of bicycle.

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  8. I ride a SS road bike at 46/16 and while I bought it for the low cost, I love it for the workout. I have to admit that it's hard to commute with, though. It is moderately hilly where I live and I arrive at work sweaty. So I can only ride on cooler days if I don't want to shower at work.

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  9. I would say its not possible to say whats "going backwards" as far as bicycles go. It depends like all things on the most important aspect, which is what you want to DO with it.

    If you want to travel by bike, with the smallest possible use of energy, as fast as possible, then get a geared bike.

    But if you have a bike to get fit (which I do) then the singlespeed has alot of advantages. Its far lighter than a geared bike of similar price range (7.4kg), has almost nothing on it that can break or get clogged in mud/salt/grit, and I find isnt actually significantly slower than my old days when had a Claud Butler 24 speed.

    The arguments about singlespeeds being owned by annoying hipsters and so on, can just as easily be reversed if you want to make it about the owners rather than the machine - by me moaning about "gearies" spending all afternoon talking about what groupset they are running, and wearing lycra all day long etc (which is no more correct that saying Singlespeeds are owned only be wannabe cyclists with canvas shoes and beards).

    I just did 142km Oxford to Cambridge on Saturday for the British Heart Foundation cycle on
    my singlespeed, and was by no means at the rear of the pack. Also nobody came up at any of the rest stops and called me a hipster, and neither did I call them anything back. Bikes are bikes
    and the enemies are potholes, car-doors, ice and badly designed cyclepaths....not other cyclists.

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    1. Yep, I agree with everything you just said. No enemies here, just fellow cyclists trying to coexist on the roads with cars. Gears and brakes on our bikes help us as cyclists to remain law abiding citizens by not skidding to stop signs or completely running through them. I'm sure your single speed isn't a fixed gear and you wouldn't do a ride with other cyclists on a bike with no brakes. Not that there is anything wrong with that, there is a guy at work that leads our group rides on his fixed gear. He is one of the few responsible fixed gear riders that I know. What I hope, however, is that whether someone is a "gearie" or a "fixie" that people simply stop posing or charading as wanna be cyclists and ride their bikes responsibly. That, I would say, is the underlying message of this article.

      On another note, I'm still waiting on someone to send me a link of them cycling through some steep mountain pass on their fixed gear bicycle. I would love to have that footage, if it even exists.

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    2. Woah, you're backpedaling harder than some on a fixie. In an article about geared vs. single speed freewheel (go ahead and group fixed in), you boldly go in the direction of geared vs. poser, hipster, goofy crowd. I'm not convinced that piggy-backing on someone else's share-the-road perspective later on can validate the article.

      My background / qualifications: I started my biking life on a steel geared bike, commuting as much as possible over the Queensboro bridge into Manhattan. I swore against fixed gear bikes as crazy, un-safe death machines. Slowly though, I progressed, bought a single speed for the weight, functionality, and simplicity. Flipped the hub to a fixed just to see how it would feel, and have been stuck ever since. Now I ride in Seattle, keeping my fixed gear despite the hills. I've switched back to a freewheel on multiple occasions to test my opinions and always fall back to fixed as a preference. I've lost the feeling of stability when I don't have to continue to pedal. I've also done two century rides now, one of them fixed, and the glaring similarity is that your ass will always hurt more than your legs.

      I feel the need to +1 Snowygrouch's point that annoying hipsters are on the same level as pretentious "gearies" and their lycra. If the goal of your article and website is to enlighten people to the wonderful world of cycling, be very careful not to alienate people because you feel they have fallen into a stereotype. History hasn't been kind to those who are prejudiced.

      My overarching point is that choosing a bike has two major factors. One, the type of riding you are doing, whether its distance, urban, mountain, or track. Two, your personal preference (speed, functionality, aesthetic, identity, price point, etc.). I hope you prefer that someone in your region picks up ANY bike and starts riding happily as opposed to choosing to avoid the pretentious crowd that we're positioned as.

      Also, there is nothing illegal about skidding to a stop sign as long as you stop.

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    3. I am not prejudging anyone for the mode of transportation which they decide to use when they get around. As time goes by (look at the date this article was written, almost two years ago...) I have had to backpedal some, as the fixed gear bicycle has widened in use from hipster like college kids to everyday people. There is an additional skill set required in learning how to stop on a fixed gear bike that a lot of people did not have or did not use in the beginning. Without that skill set it is impossible to correctly stop the bike when you need to stop it. There is nothing illegal about skidding to a stop, but not coming to a complete stop is illegal. In Texas, where I live, that requires cyclists to take one foot off the pedal and put it on the ground while reach a stop at wait 3 seconds before crossing the stop sign or turning right on red. Ask yourself, how many guys riding on these kinds of bikes actually make all their stops on the road? Trackstanding does not count as a stop where I live. This is the #1 reason why cyclists get a bad rep and suffer the ire from motorists on the road. Motorists feel that cyclists are above the law and can get away with more stuff because they are on a bicycle. Again, I am not labeling all fixed gear riders as irresponsible. Some of my former co-workers were fixed gear bicycle commuters and knew how to ride their bikes and come to stops. That being said, there are also racer types in Lycra who are Strava obsessed and can't be bothered to stop at a light so that their average speed doesn't go down. It's something all types of cyclists need to keep in mind. Cycling is becoming more popular and cities are making it easier for cyclists to get around. Just remember that what is being given to the cycling community can easily be taken away.

      There is nothing wrong with say, commuting to work on a mountain bike and riding your fixed gear at the park trails on the weekends. Just because you are a cyclist doesn't mean you have to belong in only one subculture or another. As time goes by, this is something I am learning to embrace more. There is no such thing as junk miles, and just because a ride isn't on Strava does not mean it didn't happen. The wonderful world of cycling is, really wonderful. However people decide to ride a bicycle, the more people are doing it the more it will contribute to a healthier society, which I believe is what we all want. We can all make a better world for cyclists if we behave responsibly on the roads and consider the safety of others as well as our own, no matter what kind of bike we ride. Back in the day skateboarders used to be considered trespassing law breakers until they got skateparks. Fixed gear cyclists probably had a similar rep, now they have bike polo. Both activities are cool to participate in, you just have to be straight edge about it.

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  10. I dunno, from your comments this rant seems to be aimed at bad cyclists, who ride without brakes, run reds, and generally act kind of like dicks... fair enough. But then you seem to extend this to anyone who rides fixed, which is clearly, I hope you can see, ridiculous. Worse you then use this as an argument not to ride fixed, which is clearly circular. Don't ride fixed because fixed riders ride badly. So yeah, not getting that at all...

    Having said that I agree a geared bike is better for most people, but then I don't think 'most people' would ever choose a fixed gear. Here in the UK the only people who ride fixed are a) bike messengers b) posey people (and hey if they want to pose, who are we to criticise; I like to look good and dress well, so do most people, and it's getting them cycling) or c) 'serious cyclists' who also own lycra, and spend fair amounts of money on cycling generally (and also own a 20 speed). So my problem with your post is in two parts:

    i) Partially circular
    ii) There's no need to convince most people not to ride fixed because the only people who do are doing it for very specific reasons (be it cost, maintenance and a flat urban environment, or wanting to look fashionable, or improving cadence).

    Specifically I live in Cambridge, a 'cycling city' (with really shitty infrastructure), and the average Joe rides a beaten up old banger with a 3 speed, or a dérailleur so rusty it doesn't change any more.

    Also who in the world uses 52/12 on a single speed?

    Also (mark2), I'm currently converting a lovely steel frame for use as a fixed, to complement my geared bike. I don't care if this makes people angry, because my bikes are for riding (by me in my unique circumstances), not pleasing other people, ironically what many accuse hipsters of riding fixies for....

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    1. Anonymous, it seems that you self-identify which some of the criticisms that I have laid out against riding fixed gear bikes. So while you seem slightly offended either way as to what I have to say about the subject, I also observe that you agree with and reinforce just about everything that I wrote in my article.

      So while you point out my article as being circular (which I'll assume means redundant in our jargon) you are saying that there is no need to be calling anyone out if they choose to ride a fixed gear. Fair enough, however you just called yourself out.

      By the way, I love British people, my favorite bike that I own was built in a small shop in Leeds, England. And unlike a lot of Americans you guys don't have polarized views on things and open up the table for discussion. I appreciate that quality that Brits in general, at least the one's I've talked to, possess.

      It is my hope that your fixed gear conversion goes well. However, I do not see the need to convert something nice to something so simplistic, to complement my less simplistic bicycles. If my derailleurs, freewheels, or chains wear out, I simply replace them and carry on. I ride fast on my old steel bike, browse through a few or my articles and you'll find I'm no tortoise because I ride steel. I neither see the need for a fixed gear or carbon bike if you ask me. I just take care of the bike I have, and train harder on it to go faster.


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  11. Way to backpedal on your douchey initial uninformed 'assessment'

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    1. I can't figure out whether you are insulting me or complementing me that I have taken the edge off my article and modified it so that everyone can understand it in the right context. Either way I don't appreciate being called douchey on the internet. It makes you who are saying it look like an idiot in front of my 300 daily viewers, many who agree with me. Yes, I toned this article down and simplified it so that even fixed gear hipsters can read it and understand it. I tried to leave out as many big, difficult to pronounce words as I could.

      I don't know what your angle is and what you are trying to accomplish besides trolling. So this will be the last douchey comment I publish from you. My article is informative, as I work in the industry, involve myself with other cyclists and am an active member of the local cycling community. Now shut up, get off your fixie and ride a real, manly bike with gears, preferably a steel bike with a Brooks saddle like I do. I'm done reasoning with internet trolls (and hipsters). Time to quit whining in front of the computer, take off those ridiculous adult diapers and go ride a big boy bike. Have at it.

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  12. I never understood single speed bikes and also thought its a step back in time. Recently I noticed that during my rides in hilly terrain I shift a constantly and I asked my self on each shift it was really necessary. I quickly realized that I have a very narrow bandwidth of cadence that I stay in. This is not a good thing in my opinion. Riding a single speed will help you develop a broader range and make you faster. And by faster I mean faster on your geared bike.

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  13. Thanks for your comment. As I mentioned in the article that is one of the reasons people tend to go with single speed bikes, to train by pushing the same cadence over varying terrain. I'm not disputing the benefits of training on a single speed bike. However, the same gains can be made by finding the right gear ratio on a geared bike and pushing through the harder sections without shifting. I ride a 14 speed bike with downtube shifters. I seldom shift the rear gears and instead do most on my shifting on my larger and smaller front chainrings when climbing or sprinting. I have found this technique very effective, and when done on a regular basis, has increased my average speed by 1 1/2 miles an hour. A bicycle without brifters is just as beneficial for training as a single speed bike. There is no need to shift the rear gears on every hill, you are absolutely right about that.

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  14. I feel the most frustrating part about people that diss geared bikes is the idea that they break. SHIFT BEFORE YOU START THE HILL. ITS THAT SIMPLE. DON'T TAKE YOUR ROAD BIKE OF CURBS. ITS A FINE TUNED MACHINE.

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    1. Thanks for the reply. I know I'm not the only person who's experienced the holier than thou attitudes from fixie riders. It's funny how in 2014 they finally seem to be going away. Fads like that aren't made to last.

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  15. Sorry if this is a double post.

    Looking to by a bike in the 350-400 range to get in shape. Terrain varies but slight inclination suburb type trail stuff. Would need to be able to attach carrier so youngest could tag along. Not sure if single or multi geared is best.

    Appreciate your help.

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    1. I can only tell you what has worked for me personally, and that would be a multi-geared bike, especially if I am towing my son along in the trailer. At your price range you have a lot of options. However, I would start looking at used bikes for sale first before trying to buy a new bike. For $400.00 you can buy a very nice, lightly used and high quality bicycle. Check out the online classifieds, used sporting equipment stores and local bike shops that sell used bikes. You might be surprised what you will find. Thanks for reading my blog and for your comment.

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  16. Your points about single speeds or fixed gear bikes not being able to perform the same under varying conditions as geared bikes is a valid argument. Like you mention, the Tour de France isn't being won on single speeds. If I lived in the western US or another mountainous region I probably wouldn't even think about a single speed but I live in the Midwest and the endless flat to rolling terrain makes it an option for people around here.

    As far as the arguments that single speeds are far less maintenance, simpler and break less, only two of those can really be argued as advantages. I completely agree with the poster above who pointed out proper shifting technique is important to having a smoothly functioning geared bike. Its not that hard either. Where I see advantages for single speeds is riding in nasty conditions like winter or in mud. Also as a reliable and simple commuter (if your commute isn't too hilly), training tool for those that would like to do that and lastly just for fun! I really think there is something to be said for just being able to jump on a bike and go ride without having to think about much. For the fun factor and a completely different riding experience I am tempted to pick up a single speed.

    As far as fixies go, to me; they seem to have the potential to be incredibly dangerous and I have zero interest in riding one.

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    1. Thanks for your reply. I think that it's logical to say that in most cases a geared bike with brakes will be better suited for riding than a single speed bike or fixie. Three years ago when I wrote this article fixed geared bikes were soaring in popularity and there was a lot of cycling accidents and fatalities as a result of unskilled cyclists trying to use fixed gear bikes. It's crazy the amount of backlash and controversy I have gotten in some of the comments on my article. Thank you for adding something positive to this discussion.

      I have a single speed mountain bike, so I'm not completely anti-gears. I am even thinking about doing a local race on it in the single speed division. I'm only considering it right now because (a) it's winter (b) I'm hoping the "real" racers stay home and (c) just for fun.

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  17. Come on people Johnny posted this beautiful page.......well I can say full of information which u landed here(cause u wanted to know the mentioned topics, well like me...) not to argue with some random annoying "commentors". Thanks Johnny Guzman keep up the good work.

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